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Wolf Tales

TARGET AUDIENCE:
Grades 1 – 4

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:
Who’s afraid of the “big, bad wolf”? In this interactive program, students explore the influential role that literature plays forming our views and attitudes towards wildlife. We compare and contrast two folk stories in which the wolf is a main character, distinguish between fact and fiction, and compare literary portrayals of wolves with the real thing! All programs feature real-time observations of the International Wolf Center’s ambassador wolves.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:
Students will be able to:

  • Distinguish between fact and fiction
  • Give examples of facts and fiction about wolves
  • Understand that, while stories often assign human qualities to animals, they do not actually feel or act like humans.
  • Compare and contrast two folk stories about wolves.
  • Compare and contrast folklore about the wolf with real wild wolves.

 

NATIONAL STANDARDS TO WHICH THIS PROGRAM ALIGNS

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE
As a result of activities, all students should develop understanding of the characteristics of organisms.

NL-ENG.K-12.1 READING FOR PERSPECTIVE
Students read a variety of texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.

NL-ENG.K-12.3 EVALUATION STRATEGIES
Students comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., context, graphics).

NL-ENG.K-12.6 APPLYING KNOWLEDGE
Students apply knowledge of language structure, media techniques, figurative language, and genre to discuss texts.

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING
Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.

VOCABULARY WORDS
fact, fiction, character, plot, story, folktale, folklore, imagination, literature
(with older students we may also use: stereotype, metaphor)

SUGGESTED PRE-PROGRAM PREPARATION

  • Brainstorm fictional books the children may have read or seen that have wolf characters in it.
  • Discuss the difference between storybook animals and real animals
  • Compare fact-based books and fiction books. How can you tell the difference?
  • Brainstorm or visit www.wolf.org to develop questions for instructor.

 

SUGGESTED POST-PROGRAM FOLLOW UP

  • Have students bring in storybooks from home that have wolf characters. Examine the various ways wolves are presented, consider how illustrations contribute to your impression of wolves.
  • Expand your list of facts about wolves by reading books and using www.wolf.org.
  • Do the “Folktale Focus” activity with the class, see section 3 of the International Wolf Center’s Gray Wolves, Gray Matter curriculum
  • Do the “Little Red Takes Many Paths” activity with the class, see section 3 of the International Wolf Center’s Gray Wolves, Gray Matter curriculum
  • Discuss the use of metaphor in literature. In what ways does the wolf serve as a metaphor for abstract concepts in folklore?

 

WHAT TO EXPECT DURING AN INTERACTIVE VIDEOCONFERENCE PROGRAM WITH THE INTERNATIONAL WOLF CENTER

All videoconference programs with the International Wolf Center combine real-time observations of the Center’s resident pack of ambassador wolves with lively discussion, interactive activities, and question/answer time with a wolf expert. Students will observe the wolves behaving naturally in their 1.25 acre wooded enclosure, which may mean that the wolves are resting or out of view. International Wolf Center staff will do their best to ensure that the students observe the wolves being active, but we make no guarantees.

Teachers are asked to remain in the classroom with the students during the program. When the instructor poses a question to the students, we ask that the teacher call on a student to answer. Students are encouraged to answer as loudly as possible into a microphone, but the teacher may still need to repeat the answer so the instructor can hear what the student said.

Because audio and video quality can vary greatly during a program, please let the instructor know if you didn’t hear or understand something or if you can’t see what the instructor is talking about.

We encourage questions! We will reserve at least 10 minutes at the end of each program for student questions. Teachers may wish to have the students visit www.wolf.org before the program to prepare questions. Questions may relate to the program’s theme or may be about wolves in general.

During the Wolf Tales program the instructor will complete a worksheet that organizes the facts and fiction about wolves. Teachers may wish to have students complete the worksheet during the program. This is optional and entirely up to the teacher. The worksheet is included with this teacher page.

Thanks for your interest in wolves, we are looking forward to the program!